More Than Half Of Brits Wish They Had Asked Their Grandparents More About The War

New research reveals that 46% of Brits are concerned that D-Day is at risk of being forgotten when the last veterans pass away.

  • 44% of Brits who no longer have grandparents ‘regret’ not spending more time with them when they were alive
  • Kids spending more time on social media is now the biggest negative influence on relationships with grandparents, according to 63%
  • Almost a quarter (21%) of those whose grandparents lived during the war but are not alive today, admitted to never asking their grandparents about the war
  • Only 18% think enough is taught about D-Day in schools

Not Enough

New research released today by forces.net, reveals that 54% of parents whose own grandparents were alive during the war feel they don’t have enough information about their grandparents time in the war to share with their children.

While 46% of Brits are concerned that D-Day is at risk of being forgotten when the last veterans pass away. The study of 2,000 adults found the top questions Brits with grandparents who lived during the war but are no longer alive wish they’d asked their older relatives are ‘What was it like living through the war?’ (31%), ‘What did you do in the war?’ (27%) and ‘What was the scariest thing about the war?’ (27%).

Additional

Additional questions they wish they’d asked include, ‘Did any of your friends or family die in the war?’ (22%), ‘What was an average meal during the war?’ (22%), ‘What did your parents do in the war?’ (21%) and ‘How do you think the war changed your future?’ (17%).

Nearly half (49%) of Brits whose grandparents were alive during the war either don’t remember stories they were told or simply were not told any wartime stories by their grandparents – and 71% don’t have any wartime memorabilia passed down to them from their grandparents.

Regret

44% of the those polled admitted they regret not spending more time with their grandparents when they were alive, citing the lure of friends over family (38%) and living in a different city (32%) as the main reasons why they didn’t spend more time with them.

55% recalled seeing their grandparents face-to-face less than three times a month. And their children have followed suit, with half (50%) of parents admitting that their offspring speak to their grandparents less than three times a month.

Hope

Of respondents who think children today spend less time with their grandparents than in the past, 63% think that the interest in social media is the biggest reason for children spending less time with their grandparents today, followed by the fact that people live further apart (61%).

Despite this, 61% of parents hope that when they are a grandparent their grandchildren will spend lots of time with them.

Important

Adam Waters, Director of Digital, BFBS said: “The research demonstrates how important grandparent and grandchild relationships are to maintaining memories of historical military events. That’s why, as part of the D-Day 75 commemorations, we’re promoting relationships between generations as pivotal to ensuring that the public continues to be reminded about poignant days in our history.”